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Steve Hinnefeld

    Panel of Indiana University experts to discuss Edward Snowden, NSA monitoring

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Experts on foreign affairs, cybersecurity, military intelligence, diplomatic history and related topics will gather this week at Indiana University Bloomington to discuss the classified documents released by Edward Snowden and their implications for national security.

    "Can You Hear Me Now? A Panel Discussion on Edward Snowden and the NSA Surveillance Program" will take place at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, in Room 123 of the IU Maurer School of Law, 211 S. Indiana Ave.

    The event is sponsored by the Center on American and Global Security at IU Bloomington with support from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the Maurer School of Law, the Department of Political Science, the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Global and International Studies.

    Snowden, a former intelligence analyst, released voluminous classified materials that have been made public by England's Guardian newspaper. The documents revealed that the National Security Agency has monitored communications by unsuspecting members of the public, sparking a vigorous debate about the balance between national security and privacy.

    Sumit Ganguly, director of the Center on American and Global Security, will moderate Friday's discussion. Ganguly is a professor of political science in the College of Arts and Sciences and holds the Rabindranath Tagore Chair in Indian Cultures and Civilizations. Panelists will include:

    Fred Cate, Distinguished Professor and C. Ben Dutton Professor in the Maurer School of Law and director of the Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research. Cate, who specializes in information privacy and security law issues, has testified before numerous congressional committees and speaks frequently before professional, industry and government groups. Nick Cullather, professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences and a specialist in the history of intelligence, development and nation-building. He is researching the early history of the CIA and whether centralized intelligence is compatible with democratic ideals. David Fidler, the James Louis Calamaras Professor of Law in the Maurer School of Law. He is one of the world's leading experts on cybersecurity law and policy, and the rule of law in counterinsurgency and threats posed by biological weapons and bioterrorism. Lee Hamilton, director of the Center on Congress, professor of practice in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs and distinguished scholar in the School of Global and International Studies. Hamilton represented southern Indiana in Congress from 1965 to 1999 and has been a leading voice on international relations and American national security for more than 40 years. William Scheuerman, professor of political science in the College of Arts and Sciences. His research and teaching interests include modern political thought, democratic theory, legal theory and international political theory.

    The Snowden panel is part of a series of lectures and discussions of national security-related topics scheduled this semester by the Center on American and Global Security. Other events include:

    Sept. 13: "Can China Rise Peacefully?", John Mearsheimer, the R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago, 5:30 p.m., Swain Hall West 007. Oct. 11: "Springs and Their Offspring: The International Consequences of Domestic Uprisings," John Owen, professor of international relations, Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics, University of Virginia. Oct. 25: "The Tale of the Triad: The Unknown History and Uncertain Future of America's Nuclear Arsenal," Stephen Schwartz, adjunct professor, Monterey Institute of International Studies. Nov. 15: "Should We Stay or Should We Go? Explaining Patterns of Leadership Defection by Arab Militaries in the Uprisings of 2011," Risa Brooks, associate professor of political science, Marquette University.

    The Center on American and Global Security is supported by the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Global and International Studies.