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Malcolm M. FeeleyMalcolm M. Feeley

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Ken Turchi
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Steve Hinnefeld

    Interdisciplinary law scholar to deliver Jerome Hall Lecture at IU Maurer School of Law

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- A distinguished interdisciplinary legal scholar will deliver the Jerome Hall Lecture at the IU Maurer School of Law on Wednesday, Oct. 23.

    Malcolm M. Feeley, the Claire Sanders Clements Dean’s Professor of Law at the University of California-Berkeley, will deliver a lecture titled “The Unconvincing Case Against Private Prisons.” It examines the Israeli Supreme Court’s 2009 holding that private prisons are unconstitutional, a position with which Feeley disagrees.

    Before joining the Berkeley Law faculty in 1984, Feeley was a fellow at Yale Law School and taught at New York University and the University of Wisconsin. He served as the director of the campus Center for the Study of Law and Society from 1987 to 1992. He has also been a visiting professor at Hebrew University, Kobe University and Princeton University.

    Feeley has written or edited more than a dozen books and has authored several dozen articles in social science journals and law reviews. His most recent articles examine issues of federalism, women and crime in the 18th century, prison privatization, and the role of bench and bar in fostering political liberalism. Feeley has received research fellowships from the Russell Sage Foundation, Guggenheim Foundation, National Institute of Justice, National Science Foundation, American Bar Foundation and the Twentieth Century Fund. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Austin College and a Master of Arts and Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

    The Hall Lecture is named for Jerome Hall, an internationally recognized faculty member at the IU Maurer School of Law from 1939 to 1970. He was a pioneer in the interdisciplinary analysis of legal issues. The lecture will take place at noon in the Law School’s Moot Court Room, with a reception afterward. It is free and open to the public. Indiana continuing legal education credit is pending.